Daily Grammar

Lesson 126

Parts of the Sentence - Appositives

An appositive is a word or group of words that identifies or renames the noun or pronoun that it follows. It is set off by commas unless closely tied to the word that it identifies or renames. ("Closely tied" means that it is needed to identify the word.)

Example:
My son Carl is a medical technician. (no commas)
Badger, our dog with a missing leg, has a love for cats. (commas needed)

Appositives should not be confused with predicate nominatives. A verb will separate the subject from the predicate nominative. An appositive can follow any noun or pronoun including the subject, direct object, or predicate nominative.

Instructions: Identify the appositives in the following sentences and tell whether they are appositives to subjectsThe subject tells who or what about the verb.  Source: Lesson 91, direct objectsA direct object receives the action performed by the subject. The verb used with a direct object is always an action verb. Another way of saying it is that the subject does the verb to the direct object.
Source: Lesson 106
, or predicate nominativesA predicate nominative or predicate noun completes a linking verb and renames the subject. It is a complement or completer because it completes the verb. Predicate nominatives complete only linking verbs.
Source: Lesson 101
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1. The neighbor boys, the twins, were excellent baseball players.

The neighbor boys, the twins, were excellent baseball players.

2. The girl in the red dress is Sarah, our best actress.

The girl in the red dress is Sarah, our best actress.

3. Have you read Brothers, a book by Dean Hughes?

Have you read Brothers, a book by Dean Hughes?

4. There goes Grant Long, the electrical contractor.

There goes Grant Long, the electrical contractor.

5. My friend, Matt Matson, collects lost hubcaps.

My friend, Matt Matson, collects lost hubcaps.

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