Daily Grammar

Lesson 259

Parts of the Sentence - Adjective Clauses

In using an adjective clauseThe adjective clause is a dependent clause that is used to modify a noun or a pronoun. It will begin with a relative pronoun (who, whose, whom, which, and that) or a subordinate conjunction (when and where). Those are the only words that can be used to introduce an adjective clause.
Source: Lesson 251
, you should always place it as near to the word it modifies as possible. If you misplace the adjective clause, it makes a ridiculous sentence or one that is unclear.

Example:
I waved to my dog from the car that had just licked my face. = incorrect
I waved to my dog that had just licked my face from the car. = correct

Instructions: Rewrite the following sentences placing the adjective clause in the correct place.

1. They drove to the lake in their new car where they love to fish for bass.

They drove in their new car to the lake where they love to fish for bass.

2. The large limousine pulled up to the curb, which was loaded with students for the prom.

The large limousine, which was loaded with students for the prom, pulled up to the curb.

3. The new tricycle was smashed on the driveway that had been delivered yesterday.

The new tricycle that had been delivered yesterday was smashed on the driveway.

4. We showed the pictures to our friends that we had taken at the wedding.

We showed to our friends the pictures that we had taken at the wedding.

5. We caught several fish with the new bait, which we cooked for dinner.

We caught several fish, which we cooked for dinner, with the new bait.

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