Daily Grammar

Lesson 353

Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

Use a comma or commas to set off an appositiveAn appositive is a word or group of words that identifies or renames the noun or pronoun that it follows. Source: Lesson 126 if not closely tied"Closely tied" means that it is needed to identify the word. to the words it equals or identifies.

Examples:
Larry Millward, my best friend, will speak at the meeting.
My brother Ken moved to Hawaii. (closely tied)

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. Fred James a soldier captured during World War II spoke at the assembly.

Fred James, a soldier captured during World War II, spoke at the assembly.

2. My sister Elaine died recently.

no commas needed (It is closely tied, but one could take Elaine as a noun of address if you don't know her as the sister.)

3. Paul the top student in his class was the valedictorian.

Paul, the top student in his class, was the valedictorian.

4. Small farming a very important occupation is disappearing.

Small farming, a very important occupation, is disappearing.

5. We rode all day on Dot a very old and gentle horse.

We rode all day on Dot, a very old and gentle horse.

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