Word Place
Daily Grammar
HomeWorkbookeBookArchiveGlossaryBlogFan MailLinksEmail Us
   

Quiz for Lessons 111-115

Parts of the Sentence - Subject/Verb, Predicate Nominative, Direct Object

 

Instructions: Find the subjects, verbs, predicate nominatives, direct objects, interjections, and introductory there in these sentences.

 

1. Both the lady and the gentleman had proper manners and good etiquette.

 

2. My wife dusted the furniture and cleaned the floors.

 

3. There is no reason for this mess.

 

4. Where is the white tablecloth for the table?

 

5. Well, there are no more candles for sale.

 

6. The actress was still a very beautiful and lovely person.

 

7. My mother wanted both flour and sugar from the neighbor.

 

8. The student knew the answer and was sure of it.

 

9. The snow storm raged during the night and all day.

 

10. Jim caught and cleaned both fish quickly.

 

 

--For answers scroll down.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answers:

 

1. lady, gentleman = subjects / had = verb / manners, etiquette = direct objects

 

2. wife = subject / dusted = verb / furniture = direct object // cleaned = verb / floors = direct object

 

3. There = introductory there / reason = subject / is = verb

 

4. tablecloth = subject / is = verb

 

5. well = interjection / there = introductory there / candles = subject / are = verb

 

6. actress = subject / was = verb / person = predicate nominative

 

7. mother = subject / wanted = verb / flour, sugar = direct objects

 

8. student = subject / knew = verb / answer = direct object // was = verb

 

9. storm = subject / raged = verb

 

10. Jim = subject / caught, cleaned = verbs / fish = direct object

 






Previous Lesson

DAILY GRAMMAR - - - - by Mr. Johanson

Copyright 2014 Word Place, Inc - - All Rights Reserved.

Next Lesson


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our

lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are

also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

 

Daily Grammar Lessons Search

Loading